Go Back   Home > SciFlicks SQUAD! Forums > Sci-Fi Movies Galleria > Sci-Fi Movie Titles: [ S -- Z ] > Star Wars (1977-2005) [movie series]

Welcome to the SciFlicks SQUAD! Forums.

You are currently viewing our community boards as a guest which gives you limited access to view most discussions, articles and access our other FREE features. By joining our free and open-minded sci-fi community you will be able to start and reply to forum discussions, write movie reviews, communicate privately with other members (PM), respond to polls and access many other special features. Registration is fast, simple and absolutely free so please, join our community today!

If you have any problems with the registration process or with your account please contact support here.

Star Wars (1977-2005) [movie series]

Every generation has a legend. Every journey has a first step. Every saga has a beginning. | Episode I guide

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old Feb 14, 2005, 12:17 PM   #1
Unregistered
n/a flights since
phantom menace revisited

Anakin Skywalker, in Episode I, should see himself, even at that young age, as a pivotal figure in the universe. George Lucus should have had Anakin reply to Qui-gon Jinnís comment that he must have Jedi reflexes if he can race pods, that the first time he raced at the pod track he felt as though he had been there before, that he had known every turn and obstacle as though he had been racing it his whole life. Anakin should describe how whenever he begins to have a relationship with somebody, or wherever he goes, he always feels that he is at home, and that it bothers him that others do not feel that way. Anakin should be presented as a child prodigy. Just as some children are born to play the piano or to consume books by age one, Anakin should be presented as a precocious child who can adapt to the environments around him, in the same way that some animals know as soon as they leave the womb how to react to their environment (I canít think of specific examples at the moment) . This would explain his mechanical aptitude (it is the environment in which Watto raised him) and his ability to race pods. He should also explain to Qui-gon that he wants to help people because he knows that people are weak because they cannot adapt themselves in the way that he can. He sees his talent as a tool merely, one that he would like to give to everybody else, but canít. He believes that people lie to hide their weaknesses, which he understands and does not blame, but these lies cause people to lead off-centered lives and leads, ultimately, to their needless suffering. Anakin would have had several examples of human weakness and good people gone bad (through gambling, etc) while living in Mos Espa. He should comment, or perhaps it would be better to have it shown, that because he was born with the talent to adapt, that he is a natural leader. He should have a very strong desire to help people defeat their weaknesses. However, just as some experiences can bring out a persons talent (for doing good), some experiences can push very talented people and end up bringing out their more ignoble nature. Maybe these weaknesses of the people he wants to help betray him or act so hopelessly cowardly and myopically, that he changes and decides to rid the world of weakness by destroying those who carry it, rather than attempt to enlighten people by telling them what how to make moral decisions amidst adversity. (This viewpoint is appropriate for a genuine prophet). Anakins downfall, if taken from this perspective, might happen as a result of somebody shattering his vision of himself as a world leader. Although he may have seen himself as a talent, he might resent, as he resented being a slave, being placed among the other padawans. As a slave, he would have felt that his position in life was beneath him, but was powerless to escape, and as a pad wan, he may feel that he is being forced to deny his destiny by doing what average people (average padawans, in this case) do. The system of mediocrity (as Anakin would see it, though this perspective could be a delusion taught by his previous experience on tatooine, or maybe he is genuinely being controlled by mediocre people that he feels has too much control over his life . . . [?]) the system that runs the show would be over-whelmingly irritating in the power that it has over young Anakin. Iím having trouble understanding how that would feel, if it is even a plausible conflict that could lead to the kind of frustration that pushes some one over the edge. It might be like Buddha, when he decided to leave his life of splendor to live in the streets, being locked inside the palace and having to go through the motions of living a materialistic life, knowing the danger that lies in being forced to identify himself by the physical environment in which he finds himself, and the motions of decorum in which he will have partake as a prince. I donít know, I think Iím talking about something that would require more exploration, but I thought if the phantom menace were to be re-written, that this would be a better way to begin. I think these ideas are consistent with what happens later. I feel that the star wars universe has such potential to be good. I think IV, V, and VI are adequate, though could probably be rewritten. If the prequels were longer, and deeper, I think that the original series could stand alone. I think the blue prints are there. I just wish they were written better. I think a lot of people see that there are blue prints for a good story, which is why so many people talk about them, but I think there would be less fanaticism if people didnít feel like they had to fill in the blanks.
Reply With Quote
Old Feb 14, 2005, 02:51 PM   #2
HighWiredSith
More Than Just Okay
HighWiredSith's Avatar
3,854 flights since Jul 2001
Location: The Uplift Mojo Party
Re: phantom menace revisited

Anakin should have been a teenager - around 17 or 18.

Padme should have been older as well - mid to late 20's.

TPM should have established the context of their romance, AOTC should have only had to heighten it to its inevitable result (marriage).

It would have made far more sense to have Anakin older. The idea of his being an expert pod racer would have been more sensible as would the idea that he was indeed too old to begin the Jedi training. Furthermore, this idea that one has to be snatched at birth to be a Jedi is assinine. The typical training age for a Jedi should have been around the age of nine or ten. Again, Anakin would have been "too old" but it would have been far more believable and a lot less silly.

This would have put Anakin in his early to mid 30's in ROTS, in his mid 50's in ANH and 60 by ROTJ (which, again, makes sense). It would have also pushed Obi-Wan's age up by at least ten years (I would have gone more, possibly 15 years older and altered Qui-Gon's character if not eliminate it all together) and he would have been in his mid to late 60's by ANH instead of 55 years old (like he really looked 55).

The age thing was crucial. It brought both films down to have Anakin and Padme so young, screwed with the time line, and inserted a butt-load of sappy, kid-fare for which 95% of the entire prequel nightmare can be blamed.

There you go...
HighWiredSith is offline Reply With Quote
Old Feb 16, 2005, 05:19 PM   #3
toomuchcoffee
Sector Marshall
toomuchcoffee's Avatar
848 flights since Feb 2005
Location: midwest
In Defense of Beginning Jedi Training at Infancy

I agree that obi-wan is too young.
I liked qui-gon, but I agree that he could be omitted.
Even though Anakin is clearly well passed middle age in RTOJ, I think that because we see so little of him at that age, and I suppose one could suspend disbelief by saying that the dark side deteriorated him soo much . . . etc, it is, to me, excusable. With regard to TPM, however, I think Anakin's youth is appropriate because he is meant to be portrayed as a demi-god (divine birth, etc). Jake Lloyd does not portray young anakin as a demi-god, but I do I think it is appropriate that he is too old even at such a young age to begin the Jedi training. I read an interesting quote somewhere, roughly, "Show me a child between the ages of 1 and 7, and I will show you the man." This may be an exaggeration, but I think that there may be truth to the observation. If Lucas wanted the audience to see themselves in the likenesses of the jedi, then it would be more appropriate that anakin's age be older, but the Jedi are held to higher standards and, in order to meet those standards, they probably have to be molded at a very young age.
Also, I think that constructing a droid may be less of a feat in a technologically advanced society--perhaps all it takes is the ability to put wires together and insert a protocol personality/memory chip bought at the local used droid shop.
I think a better description of his talents would explain the rest. Which, I guess, we'll never get.

Last edited by toomuchcoffee : Mar 4, 2005 at 03:22 AM.
toomuchcoffee is offline Reply With Quote
Old Feb 17, 2005, 04:08 PM   #4
toomuchcoffee
Sector Marshall
toomuchcoffee's Avatar
848 flights since Feb 2005
Location: midwest
Biology vs Spiritual Destiny in Anakin

I think also that presenting the 10-year-old Anakin as possessing the insight of a 40-year-old, or beyond his years at least, which was not done, would have been more effective in establishing Anakin's potential greatness. It would have explained why Qui-gon was so insistent on training him, and I think that it would have given us a good idea as to the potential that is to develop, or had the potential to develop, in Anakin. I don't think that he should be portrayed as being one of us, I think that he should be a superhuman, but one that has to deal with human emotions. I am reminded of the prologue to The Last Temptation of Christ. I think the mistake was not with Anakin's age, but the insistence that he is just like any other kid (yelling "yippee!" etc.) More emphasis on the superhuman in conflict with the human would have been better, and I think this can exist in a young kid, at least a mythical one, which is what Lucas intends the story to be. Episodes IV, V, and VI, I think, allow us to relate to the hero, an allegory on man learning to deal with the universe as it has been inherited, and the prequels, I think, relate the story of how the universe began. The creation stories are always mythical, and I think the good ones involve plenty of mistakes, pain, and sacirfice. These stories are about the gods, and the ones afterward are about normal people who deal with what they inherited, etc.


Prologue to Last Temptation of Christ:

"The dual substance of Christ--
the yearning, so human,
so superhuman,
of man to attain God . . .
has always been a deep
inscrutable mystery to me.
My principle anguish and source
of all my joys and sorrows
from my youth onward
has been the incessant,
merciless battle between
the spirit and the flesh . . .
and my soul is the arena
where these two armies
have clashed and met"

Nikos Kazantzakis,
from the book,
The Last Temptation of Christ

Last edited by toomuchcoffee : Mar 4, 2005 at 03:27 AM.
toomuchcoffee is offline Reply With Quote
Old Feb 17, 2005, 05:41 PM   #5
toomuchcoffee
Sector Marshall
toomuchcoffee's Avatar
848 flights since Feb 2005
Location: midwest
Re: phantom menace revisited

One last word--

Anakin's gift should be seen as something that existed at birth, and fully developed. Just as Christ, in myth anyway, is seen as embodying perfect spritual wisdom from birth. That's really what Anakin is, a god. His problem is his human body. I'm guessing that Yoda and Mace see Godliness in human form as being a tool, but, as it exists in Anakin, one that is capable of being used for good as well as evil. I wonder if the prequels should be immersed as much as possible in mythical language. I think that we should feel that the characters are all gods, and Anakin's downfall should be a result of his hang-up on his human side and the emotional connections he made as a child.
This is an issue in The Last Temptation of Christ. Willem Dafoe (as Christ) is tempted away from his spiritual role by his desire to fulfill his biological needs. The easier it is to resist the need to find connections in marriage and family, the easier it is to ignore biological needs, which centers on self, and engage oneself with the care of the universe. Those biological needs would have been learned by Anakin in his relationship with his mother. In his search to feel connected, he would quite naturally feel that emotional centeredness requires a female presence. Wheras a Jedi might be trained to associate spiritual self-alignment with the alignment of the universe. The jedi's relationship with the universe replaces a normal human's need to connect with the female (or male), and that replacement can't happen, I'm guessing, unless emotional attachments to the mother (or father) are denied at a young age.

Last edited by toomuchcoffee : Feb 19, 2005 at 10:28 AM.
toomuchcoffee is offline Reply With Quote
Old Feb 26, 2005, 01:56 PM   #6
toomuchcoffee
Sector Marshall
toomuchcoffee's Avatar
848 flights since Feb 2005
Location: midwest
Re: phantom menace revisited

"The first experience of anybody is the mother's body. And what Le Debleu called 'participation mystique,' mystic participation between the mother and the child and the child and the mother, is the final happy land. The earth and the whole universe, as our mother, carries this experience into the larger sphere of adult experience. When one can feel oneself in relation to the universe in the same complete and natural way as that of the child with the mother, one is in complete harmony and tune with the universe. Getting into harmony and tune with the universe and staying there is the principal function of mythology. When societies develop out of the earlier primeval condition, the problem is to keep the individual in this 'participation mystique' with the society.

. . . The child, until fifteen or so, is in a situation of dependency on the parents. This attitude of dependency, the attitude of submission to authority, expecting approval, fearing discipline, is the prime condition of the psyche. It is drilled in. Also, the particular mores, the particular notions of good and evil and roles to play of the society, are imprinted.

One is born, is a blank--a little biological creature living spontaneously out of its nature. But immediately after it is born, the society begins putting its impriniting upon it--the mother body and the whole attitude of the mother. You can have a gentle, loving mother or you can have one who is resentful of the birth, which conditions a whole psychological, out-of-adjustment, situation."
- Joseph Campbell, from the lecture entitled, "In the Beginning: Origins of Man and Myth"

Maybe Anakin should have had a bad mother, or maybe the outside forces that partook in his up-bringing should have been more effectively portrayed as being psychologically damaging. One could also say, "who cares, it's just a stupid popcorn movie," but I think that Lucas intended it to be more than that. I think that he was trying to create a story with deep mythological resonance.

I also remember that he wanted Darth Maul to look like the traditional devil, as a beast from the wild, the horns, etc. But that image was created at a time when the wilderness was bigger than human civilization, something not to be trifled with. It still is not something to be trifled with, but now, at least, we are able to escape it without fearing its intrusion, wildness is perhaps, therefore, no longer frightening. It could become one in the movies, at least, but it is not a force to be reckoned with there either, at least that I can tell. So anyway, I wonder if Darth Maul's appearance should have represented a fear that is more contemporary, under what other context does wildness rear its ugly head?

Campbell made a good point that Darth Vader (and General Grievous, it seems) are good modern metaphors for evil because they represent loss of humanity as a result of giving oneself over to the system (they both rely on life-support systems, involving also the presence of technology and our ability to live with it).

On the other hand, maybe a fear of the wilderness is not entirely removed from our psyche, after all, it can rear its ugly head in the form of catastrophic disaster. So maybe Darth Maul is appropriate.

Sidious is modern because he represents the fear of being manipulated to bad ends by those in charge, which is a modern idea. Maybe Darth Maul's wildness could represent unpredictable chaos about to be unleashed by those in power, or the natural fear that arises from the knowledge of being controlled by forces greater than oneself.

Last edited by toomuchcoffee : Feb 27, 2005 at 05:20 PM.
toomuchcoffee is offline Reply With Quote
Old May 9, 2005, 07:28 PM   #7
toomuchcoffee
Sector Marshall
toomuchcoffee's Avatar
848 flights since Feb 2005
Location: midwest
Re: phantom menace revisited

Anakin should have been humiliated in front of his mother while he was a slave. His life on Tatooine seemed pretty easy. That also would have been appropriate for children as public humiliation is something that happens to kids at school, if not to themselves then to others.

It seems that it would have worked well if Anakin as a child was basically good, but unable to maintain his personal integrity due to Watto's desire to keep Anakin's talents suppressed in order to make sure that he stays subordinate. The exploding microchip is something that could have existed, and would have been more effective, but it seems that psychological abuse/humiliation would have set taught him a lesson that he would carry with him later. There should be at that young age a genuine need to protect his dignity and make his mother proud, but if he is kicked down it would be highly frustrating and create genuine anger.
He should perhaps undergo a conflict that never gets resolved because he was never able to prove to his mother that he was not the degenerate slave that watto made him out to be. He should not miss his mother, so much as need to ensure that both of their dignity's are protected.


I don't know how the books treated the back story, but it seems odd that the Jedi would not be able to help Anakin get passed all of that, even if he tried to smother his passions. They are mind-readers after all.


Well, whatever. That is just something I wondered and thought that I'd throw it out in case any one else had any other thoughts.

Who wants to get together and re-write the movies with me? No, I'm kidding.

Last edited by toomuchcoffee : May 9, 2005 at 07:43 PM.
toomuchcoffee is offline Reply With Quote
Old May 10, 2005, 01:42 PM   #8
HighWiredSith
More Than Just Okay
HighWiredSith's Avatar
3,854 flights since Jul 2001
Location: The Uplift Mojo Party
Re: phantom menace revisited

Quote:
Originally posted by HighWiredSith
Furthermore, this idea that one has to be snatched at birth to be a Jedi is assinine. The typical training age for a Jedi should have been around the age of nine or ten. Again, Anakin would have been "too old" but it would have been far more believable and a lot less silly.

Having read most of the EPIII novelization I think I am backing off of this idea. Though Lucas doesn't seem to have enough mastery over his character's dialogue to effectively communicate this in the films, I think it's clear that the reason Jedi children are separated at birth is to disallow emotional connections to other people. This is why they are not allowed to marry or have close interpersonal relationships. A beloved spouse, child, or close family member is, in a sense, a weakness for a Jedi and a potential source of much dark side angst. We see this exhibited clearly not once but twice in Anakin's life. His first real step into the dark side was a direct result of the murder of his mother. Had he never know Shimi, had he been taken from her shortly after birth, he would have never taken this step. We see this again on a far more devastating scale with Padme. It's Anakin's emotional attachment to Padme that will ultimately drive him to the dark side of the Force.

It's not without a rather poetic sense of irony that it is the emotional attachment of father to son that restores Anakin in the end.
HighWiredSith is offline Reply With Quote
Old May 15, 2005, 04:53 PM   #9
toomuchcoffee
Sector Marshall
toomuchcoffee's Avatar
848 flights since Feb 2005
Location: midwest
Re: phantom menace revisited

I decided that I believe that I would disregard all discrepanicies and wooden acting in The Phantom Menace , as I kind of do anyway, if somebody physically pushed Jake Floyd, or did something equally humiliating, in front of Padme right after he meets her, to show that his slave existence is truly oppressive. And the humiliation should happen whenever Anakin displays some kind of precocious talent or ability, in order to make sure he knows what his place is. He could still be the nice kid with a naturally happy personality, but we should see Watto or whomever push him around and create a source of anger, that Qui-gon would recognize and would naturally want to remove a talented kid from such an abusive situation.

I don't think it has to be terribly emphasized, I think Anakin should just pick himself up after the humiliation and go back to normal. This would communicate, I think, that Anakin is putting up with it for now because he has to (the exploding micro-chip, etc), but that he stores the humiliation in his memory, teaching him the importance of becoming strong enough to prevent others from pushing him around in the future.

This bottling-up would also explain the existence of his silent demons (in the book he is described as being tormented by an inner dragon) and his tenedencies to make lists of people who imagines to be his oppressors.

Or something to that effect. I sense that I am not quite touching on it, but inserting a kind of humiliation as well as displaying that Anakin has no choice but to bottle it up and take it, might be a good precursor for the future.

I think this approach works because social humiliation is an experience that any person of a naturally good-natured disposition might expereince, but how it is dealt with has the potential to corrupt people one would guess wouldn't corrupt. I don't think it is always people who are genetically pre-dispossed for needing to control people etc. who are the ones who go bad.

Actually, that is interesting. I have wondered if so-called good-natured people are often people who do not have the intellectual ability to control others, but act that way because they have to be obediant just to survive.

Of course, there are people like Ghandi, who go for the light side.

So maybe all people of intelligence want to control and manipulate society to their will, but there is a short-term way of going about this, that requires constant vigilance and bullying, than there is the way of Ghandi, or the light, that seeks to influence and manipulate others for the purpose of creating a healthful community that works together, strecgth through numbers being the ultimate goal.

I guess that is complicated, but somewhat interesting to think about.

Actually, if someone who had never experienced Star Wars or did not know whatsoever the story, I would think that perhaps it might be better to hide his future fall from grace as much as possible just to keep it a surprise.

Then, again, as I said before, public humiliation as a child is not an uncommon experience and might not look that out of place and also would reveal more realistic humanity in the character.

Looking back, one could say, you know, I thought he was pretty normal back then, but I can understand how much more humiliating it would be for a child to know that he is being physically locked in a humiliating life because he is a slave and will very potentially never have another outlet for support. That one moment of humiliation is something that kids go through and just learn to buck up and move on, but for a slave child, the action would have greater implications that would not be seen by on-looking adults, but in fact felt very strongly by the child. It would become more obvious as the adolescent or even adult deals with over-coming these early lessons of questionable relations with adults/authority. The viewer of The Phantom Menace should be as clueless or unsuspecting of Anakin's potential fall from grace as Qui-gon was. (Perhaps to be questioned only when the Jedi council decides that he should not be trained. Then the viewer could look back and wonder about that seemingly-humiliating-but-probably-in-the long-run-not-too-damaging moment of humiliation.

I think that Qui-gon's advice to Anakin to trust his instincts would be made all the more potent and seem like extremely needed support for a talented kid that has only known oppression and make his victory at the races palpable proof of his inner-worth that no slave master could ever take away from him.

Last edited by toomuchcoffee : May 15, 2005 at 05:28 PM.
toomuchcoffee is offline Reply With Quote
Old May 16, 2005, 04:22 AM   #10
Darth Bob
The Eld
Darth Bob's Avatar
1,279 flights since Sep 2002
Location: The Dark Tower
Re: phantom menace revisited

I find the whole idea of someone being too old strange and slightly stupid, surely it would have be more dangerous to leave someone out there with the potential to use the force without the training, thus leaving them easy prey to the darkside.

ok so anakin fell to the darkside anyway, but it could have happend alot faster if he hadn't been with the jedi, Palpatine would have had unlimited access to him.
Darth Bob is offline Reply With Quote
Old May 16, 2005, 11:37 AM   #11
HighWiredSith
More Than Just Okay
HighWiredSith's Avatar
3,854 flights since Jul 2001
Location: The Uplift Mojo Party
Re: phantom menace revisited

There no excuse for Jake Lloyd's performance except for the fact that finding a child actor with the talent to pull off the worst written script in movie history may have been difficult to find.

It lent nothing to the story to have Anakin so young and the entire trilogy has suffered greatly for this decision. Even when considering why Anakin would turn to the dark side it has nothing to do with him being too old to be trained. Ultimately, Anakin turns not because he lusts after power, not even because he is, as Obi-Wan states, seduced by the dark side. He is fooled by Palpatine into embracing the dark side out of his compassion for his wife. In the end, the greatest villan in movie history comes into being because of a bad pregnancy.

Anakin wasn't evil - he was a schmuck.
HighWiredSith is offline Reply With Quote
Old May 16, 2005, 01:11 PM   #12
JACKER
The Paradisal Man
JACKER's Avatar
1,359 flights since Dec 2001
Location: Either in the gutter or the clouds
Re: phantom menace revisited

Highwired, you need to see a doctor because you may have epilepsy. Your avatar is freaking me out!!
JACKER is offline Reply With Quote
Old May 16, 2005, 01:19 PM   #13
HighWiredSith
More Than Just Okay
HighWiredSith's Avatar
3,854 flights since Jul 2001
Location: The Uplift Mojo Party
Re: phantom menace revisited

Imagine how I felt shaking my head like that for hours on end...
HighWiredSith is offline Reply With Quote
Old Sep 4, 2006, 10:12 AM   #14
toomuchcoffee
Sector Marshall
toomuchcoffee's Avatar
848 flights since Feb 2005
Location: midwest
Re: phantom menace revisited

I think The Phantom Menace would be an O.K. movie and perfectly appropriate to the development of the story if we saw Anakin experience some kind of dangerous oppression and vulnerablity as a result of being a slave, and then later, when the council rejects him, have him show vulnerablity/fear (not anger) or otherwise be emotional at the idea of being rejected by the council for fear of returning to the slave's life. I think ultimately, even though the relationship with his mother is fine and works, I think the fear should ultimately be of not being allowed to live a life of dignity and individual achievement.

Either that, or they should come up with some kind of series in between The Phantom Menace and Attack of the Clones that shows in what way being a slave has damaged him.

I think. I don't expect anybody to reply because we've talked about this ad naseum, but I was just watching some of TPM while I cleaned today, and (it's interesting to watch, more enjoyable, I think, after seeing Ep.III) I thought, Really, this movie's not that bad, but I feel that there is just one bit of knowledge about Anakin Skywalker that we need to see that is not in the movie, but if there would make the whole thing work.

Maybe my suggestion isn't quite on, but I think that I might be right about the fact that just one or two tweeks would make the movie work and connect to the whole a lot better than it does.

[EDIT]: Also, I noticed that movies seem to teach a rather conflicted idea of the relationship with authority. On the surface, Anakin resists what people tell him to, and it is his downfall, whereas Luke, although he listens to Obi-Wan and Yoda, ultimately he follows his heart as well (he leaves to go to Cloud City) and resists authority, but it his resistance that saves him.

So, the movies seem to say that human authority works only so far, that you should follow the authority of your heart. I think Anakin is not following his heart because he obeys the law of human power as opposed the law of the heart. I don't know, but I have the sense that the story as a whole is rather complicated with regard to that subject, and even thought the exectution of that story is not without its flaws, overall I think it really does tell a good story with regard to following one's heart in opposition to authority, or something like that.

Last edited by toomuchcoffee : Sep 4, 2006 at 12:50 PM.
toomuchcoffee is offline Reply With Quote
Old Sep 4, 2006, 05:41 PM   #15
xXx
Sector Marshall
xXx's Avatar
760 flights since Mar 2002
Location: Isla Clevelanda
Re: phantom menace revisited

My whole problem with Anakin was that he was never really as great as we were led to believe by Obi Wan. He was a little punk as a kid, and he turned into more of a prick as he got older. He was never that heroic to begin with. And he was never unbeatable either, an old man with a bent sabre lopped his arm off. Anakin's fall wasn't big enough. He should have been the best Jedi ever, who slowly got his humanity stripped away until he was just a shell of a man who had nothing but hate in his heart. Everyone knew how dangerous he was, but nobody did anything to stop him. They wanted him to "restore balance to the force". I never got that either, the Jedi had supposedly eraticated the Sith, why balance the scales when you have the advantage? In the end of the prequels, there were two Jedi, and two Sith, there's their balance.
xXx is offline Reply With Quote
Reply

← Previous Thread | Next Thread → Home > SciFlicks SQUAD! Forums > Sci-Fi Movies Galleria > Sci-Fi Movie Titles: [ S -- Z ] > Star Wars (1977-2005) [movie series]

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Similar Threads
phantom menace question
this mite seem like a stupid question but i was wondering if anyone could help me out with this - in phantom menace qui-jon has a conversation with...
1
reply
I Miss arguing about TPM
So here we go. On his site James Berardinelli wrote this defence of phantom...
15
replies
TPM Haters Guide to Enjoying The Phantom Menace
There's a new "Star Wars" movie coming out. You may have heard something about this if it's not just some wild Internet rumor. If it is true,...
5
replies
The Phantom Menace: Special Edition
no, it doesn't exisit. but how would you make TPM better? here's my list: 1. none of that Midichlorion stuff. 2. no virgin birth 3. "Yipee!" =...
5
replies
What's Wrong with The Phantom Menace
The Phantom Menace was, in my humble opinion as a StarWars fan since 1977, a mediocre film that does not hold up to multiple viewings the way any of...
4
replies
Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts
vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
 

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 04:10 AM.
SciFlicks cannot be held liable for the opinions expressed in these public forums.
SciFlicks Copyright © 1998-2011, Popcorn Studios.
vBulletin Copyright © 2000-2017, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.