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Spacehunter: Adventures in the Forbidden Zone (1983)

The first movie that puts you in outerspace. | guide

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Old Oct 22, 2005, 07:58 PM   #1
Optimus Prime
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Original Movie Poster

I always wondered what the name of this film was. I remember seeing it when I was younger constantly, but I just now remembered it. LOL Weird movie

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Old Dec 5, 2005, 11:02 AM   #2
HighWiredSith
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Re: Original Movie Poster

Michael Ironside as "Overdog."
I actually saw this movie in 3D when I was a kid. Saw it in a 3D double feature - Space Hunter and Metalstorm, The Destruction of Jarred Sin also in 3D. SH was better than MS but neither were that good and after a while the carboard glasses began to chafe your nose.
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Old Dec 5, 2005, 12:58 PM   #3
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Re: Original Movie Poster

That looks like 16 Candles girl (Molly Ringwald? wold?).

It actually looks like one of those god awfull role play books.
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Old Dec 5, 2005, 01:30 PM   #4
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Re: Original Movie Poster

Yeah, Molly Ringwold, pre-Sixteen Candles or The Breakfast Club.
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Old Dec 5, 2005, 02:02 PM   #5
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Re: Original Movie Poster

Looks cool in a cheesy b-movie kind of way.
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Old Dec 5, 2005, 04:09 PM   #6
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Re: Original Movie Poster

No it doesn't, it looks awful in a cheesy Z-movie kind of way
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Old Dec 5, 2005, 04:13 PM   #7
HighWiredSith
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Re: Original Movie Poster

What does B-Move mean anyway? Seems like a way of excusing bad cinema or elevating medicore cinema.

It was mindless entertainment designed to cash in on the brief 3D craze that hit in the early 80's. The real gimmick was 3D, take that away, and you have a gimmickless piece of drivvel.

I haven't seen this movie in at least 20 years.
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Old Dec 5, 2005, 04:18 PM   #8
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Re: Original Movie Poster

B-movies were originally made to support the main feature at double billings. Unless you were asking rhetorically.
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Old Dec 5, 2005, 04:52 PM   #9
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Re: Original Movie Poster

Ah, like the B-side of an old 45 record. I guess they don't have b-sides anymore.
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Old Dec 5, 2005, 06:09 PM   #10
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Re: Original Movie Poster

B-movies tends to be synonymous with cheesy SF and horror films, but they can be other genres too. Apparently Orson Welles' Touch Of Evil was a b-movie but I can't confirm that...
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Old Jun 1, 2006, 04:42 PM   #11
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Re: Original Movie Poster

Pulled this from Wikipedia:

B-movie

The term B-movie originally referred to a Hollywood motion picture designed to be distributed as the "lower half" of a double feature, often a genre film such as a Western "cowboy" film, a gangster movie, or a horror film. In the 1930s and 1940s, during the age of the "studio system," this also gave rise to the practice of referring to "A-list" or "B-list" stars.

The major studios had "B-units" that made their B-movies. These B-units provided a function analagous to a "farm team" in professional sports, in that they provided a testing ground and training opportunities for new talent. In addition, there were small studios such as Republic Pictures and Monogram Pictures which specialized in making B-movies. Some actors made a career out of acting in B-movies, such as Ronald Reagan. When the "Golden Age of Hollywood" came to an end, it took the studio system with it, and double features — the raison d'être of the B-movie — became a rarity.

The B-movie industry has had an important role in the film industry, because it created an additional point of entry into the film industry. Directors such as Jonathan Demme and John Sayles learned their craft in B-movies, and the B-movie industry provided work for émigré directors from Europe such as Fritz Lang and Edgar Ulmer during the period when they were still unknown to North American audiences. As well, actors such as Jack Nicholson and John Wayne got their start in B-movies. B-movies also provided work for former A-movie actors whose careers were on the downturn, such as Vincent Price.

Contents [hide]
1 B-movies: 1930s - 1980s
2 B-movies: 1990s and 2000s
3 C-movie
4 Z-movie
5 Psychotronic movies
6 B/C/Z-movie directors
7 Selected B/C/Z-movie actors
8 See also
9 References
10 External links



[edit]
B-movies: 1930s - 1980s
"B-movie" has come to refer to any low-budget commercial film, with lesser-known actors (B-actors). These films are often formulaic and rely on "stock" characters and themes, especially in the genres such as Westerns and horror. However, B-movies are distinguished from Z-movies in that B-movies are professionally-made commercial products. Fans of B-movies stress that the lower budgets, lower degree of oversight by studio managers, and diminished focus on box office returns may allow for creative risk-taking, energy, and originality not found in big budget Hollywood films.

This was especially true in the years following World War II, the Eisenhower era, During this period, movies with big budgets and top stars were often conservative and conventional (Around the World in Eighty Days, The Greatest Show on Earth) while B-movies explored a wider range of themes that touched on the 1950s xenophobic anxieties and fears of atomic radiation, such as (The Thing from Another World and It Came from Outer Space). The most creative B-movie directors influenced filmmaking in the A-movie system. Some 1950s B-movies, especially in the science fiction and horror genres, are still popular among film buffs today.

One of the major producers of B-movies was American International Pictures (AIP), a US company founded in 1956 by James H. Nicholson and Samuel Z. Arkoff. Its films include works by Roger Corman, Vincent Price, Herman Cohen and the early efforts of then-unknown figures such as Francis Ford Coppola, Martin Scorcese, Robert De Niro, and Jack Nicholson.

Roger Corman is often credited as being "King of the B's," although in Corman's book "How I Made 100 Movies in Hollywood and Never Lost a Dime" he claims he "...never made a "B" movie". He says that since B-movies were a phenomenon only up to the early 1950s, "...the B's had died out by the time I began directing." Corman describes his films instead as "low-budget exploitation films."

In the 1970s, film companies such as Independent-International Pictures, Film Ventures International, Charles Band Productions, Cannon Films, New Line Cinema, Golan-Globus, and others created a new generation of B-movies. Most of these companies were unable to continue as budgets soared in the early 1980s and even a comparatively low-budget, low-quality picture would cost millions of dollars, due to the public's increased expectations (e.g. for color filmstock, original music scores, and realistic special effects). However, the 1980s saw the production of a great deal of low-budget genre films, such as horror and "slasher" movies including The Fog and Slumber Party Massacre and apocalyptic/futuristic genre films such as Escape from New York.

[edit]
B-movies: 1990s and 2000s
Today, the distinction between "A-movies" and "B-movies" is not as clear, but there are still different tiers of perceived quality for movies. The subjective assessment of quality no longer depends entirely on production values or the reputation of actors. For example, a high-budget, popular action blockbuster with well-known actors may be classified by mainstream audiences as a "quality" film, whereas critics may dismiss it as a poorly-made film. The converse is also true in some cases, where a low-budget, yet artistically daring film with unknown actors may be dismissed by mainstream audiences, yet lauded as a masterwork by critics.

In recent years, the production of B-movies have seen a resurgence. In part this is due to recent technological developments in film production. Although there have always been lower cost methods of shooting movies, such as 16 mm film in the 1970s or video cameras (recording onto analog video tape), these methods could not produce films that could rival 35 mm film quality. In the 2000s, the development and widespread usage of digital cameras and digital production methods allow even lower-budget filmmakers to produce films with good image quality. In particular, High Definition (HD) digital filmmaking allows filmmakers to produce 35 mm-quality films.

Another factor is a shift in audience and critical preferences. As indicated above, B-movies allow for greater creative freedom, which allows B-movie filmmakers to tackle themes or topics that are less saleable in the mass market feature film industry. As North American and European populations are becoming more diverse, the moviegoing population is seeking out a broader range of themes and stories. As well, some actors such as Bruce Campbell and Eric Roberts have embraced their role as B-movie actors.

The resurgence in interest in B-movies can also be seen in the production in 2005 of the mainstream feature film Snakes on a Plane, about a murderer who attempts to kill his victim by releasing snakes on a jet plane. Starring A-list actor Samuel Jackson, this film's premise and title cribs heavily from the B-movie tradition.

[edit]
C-movie
In the 1980s, with the growth of cable television, the C-grade movie designation began being used to refer to low-quality genre films such as horror and science fiction films were used as "filler" programming for late night television programs such as the 1990s television series. The "C" in the term refers to both the "C" in the cable TV destination of many of the films, and to these films' below-B-movie standards.

With shows such as Mystery Science Theater 3000, poor quality horror and science fiction films were edited for brevity and presented with sarcastic commentary voiceovers that highlighted the films' scriptwriting or production shortcomings. The Elvira - Mistress of the Dark syndicated horror series, which starred Cassandra Peterson, also used this same approach of screening genre films with sarcastic commentary, but it focused on the horror genre.

David A. Prior and Mario Bava are prominent figures in the C-movie industry, and Ed Wood has been credited by some as a master of the form (although the term better applicable to his work might be "Z-movies").

Although the trend of showing low-quality genre films with satirical commentary as in Mystery Science Theater 3000 and Elvira - Mistress of the Dark may have fallen off, the cable industry still has a huge need for lower-cost "filler" programming. Cable and satellite companies now offer hundreds of channels catering to many niche interests, some of which require 24 hours a day of programming. To cut costs, channels often program "direct to video" movies. These are often modest-budget genre films (action, war-action, horror, etc) that were shot on video and never released in theatres.

[edit]
Z-movie
A Z-movie (or "Grade-Z movie") is a term applied to films with a very low budget and low quality standards that are ineptly made, often with non-professional actors. Z-movies differ from B-movies in this respect. Even though B-movies were made quickly and used mediocre scripts and lesser-known actors, B-movies still adhered to the basic professional standards of filmmaking craft. Z-movies can be divided into two sub-categories: films that were unintentionally ineptly made (due to inexperience, budgetary restrictions, etc.) and films that were designed to be ineptly made, for ironic or satirical purposes. However, determining which sub-category some Z-movies should be placed can be a subjective exercise.

Ed Wood is considered an iconic director of Z-movies, with his famous (or infamous, depending on how you look at it) Plan 9 from Outer Space widely touted as top contender for "worst film ever produced", though another outspoken group gives the honor to Vic Savage's The Creeping Terror, the cult classic with voice-over "dialogue paraphrasing" narration over close-ups of the speaking actors and low production values.

Troma is probably the best-known producer of Z-movies. Since its founding in 1974, Troma has released such classics as Redneck Zombies and Surf Nazis Must Die. Sometimes these films are produced in-house, and sometimes they are purchased from other studios and re-released, especially when such films represent the early work of a newly-famous actor. A good example of this is Sizzle Beach U.S.A., one of Kevin Costner's first films, which was purchased by Troma and re-released to capitalize on his popularity in Silverado and the then-upcoming The Untouchables.

Troma's most notorious film is The Toxic Avenger. Released in 1985, it tells the story of a man who is thrown in a toxic dumpster where he gets strange powers and is mutated into "Toxie", the toxic avenger, an extremely ugly and strong creature that cleans the streets of scum. This movie is important in the Troma history because after its release, Toxie became the icon of Troma.

Just as B-movies introduce themes, plots, and genres that are sometimes later used in big-budget A-movies, sometimes even the unusual material in Z-movies is picked up by the major studios. The plot from a Z-movie called Parts: The Clonus Horror was used by DreamWorks' to produce a big-budget film entitled The Island in 2005.

[edit]
Psychotronic movies
"Psychotronic movie" is a term coined by movie critic Michael J. Weldon to denote movies which are generally ignored by the critical establishment, whether because of obscurity or of mediocre quality as judged by mainstream taste. He got this term from the Chicago cult film The Psychotronic Man about a man who develops the bizarre ability to kill using psychic energy.[citation needed] According to a Psychotronic Film Society in Chicago, the term "psychotronic" can be defined by breaking the term into its two subcomponents: "'psycho-' as in horror, '-tronic' or electronic as science fiction".

Weldon published The Psychotronic Guide to Film and Psychotronic Video Magazine using the term "psychotronic" in this sense.[citation needed] According to the Washington Psychotronic Film Society, the term "psychotronic" is as broad as the music genre label of "alternative music", in that it refers to "...just about everything except the Norm".

[edit]
B/C/Z-movie directors
Kenneth Anger
William Beaudine
Uwe Boll
Edward Cahn
David Decoteau
John Gale
Michael Legge
Donald G. Jackson
Paul Morrissey
Nicholas Musuraca
Jean-Marie Pallardy
Fred Olen Ray
Vincent Sherman
Andy Sidaris
Phil Tucker
Ed Wood
[edit]
Selected B/C/Z-movie actors
Daniel Baldwin
Valerie Bertinelli
Karen Black
Dean Cain
Bruce Campbell
Lynda Carter
Damian Chapa
Joe Estevez
C. Thomas Howell
David Keith
Lorenzo Lamas
Traci Lords
Dolph Lundgren
Chuck Norris
Lou Diamond Phillips
Eric Roberts
Mickey Rourke
Steven Seagal
Tony Todd
Shannon Tweed
Vampira
Casper Van Dien
[edit]
See
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Old Jun 2, 2006, 05:06 AM   #12
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Re: Original Movie Poster

Wow - that should be a sticky in its own right!!

Anyhoo - Spacehunter is a great B-movie.
I never realised it was a 3-D movie originally???

It has cheesy dialogue, cheesy acting, cheesy effects.
It is a gorgonzola of a film!

Good B-movie stuff.


5/10
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